Roth or Traditional: Which IRA is right for you?

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There are many options when it comes to how to save for retirement, with one of the most popular being an Individual Retirement Account (or an IRA). With two different types leading the pack, it can be hard to determine which type of IRA you should go for. Here, we break down the differences between a traditional and a Roth IRA, as well as their advantages and disadvantages so you can determine which type is right for you.

What is a Traditional IRA?
A traditional IRA (individual retirement account) allows individuals to direct pre-tax income toward investments that can grow tax-deferred. The IRS assesses no capital gains or dividend income taxes until the beneficiary makes a withdrawal. Individual taxpayers can contribute 100 % of any earned compensation up to a specified maximum dollar amount. Income thresholds may also apply. Contributions to a traditional IRA may be tax-deductible depending on the taxpayer's income, tax-filing status and other factors.” - Investopedia

Pros

  • Tax deductions are made with pre-tax dollars

  • Flexible contribution restrictions

  • Extended contribution timeline per year (15.5 months instead of 12)

Cons

  • Required minimum distributions

  • Employer plans can interfere with tax-deductible contributions

  • Restrictions on investments

  • There are penalties for early withdrawal

What is a Roth IRA?
Roth IRAs are funded with after-tax dollars; the contributions are not tax deductible—although you may be able to take a Saver's Tax Credit of 10% to 50% of the contribution, depending on your income and life situation. But once you start withdrawing funds, qualified distributions (see below) are tax-free.” - Investopedia

Pros

  • Savings grow tax-free

  • There are no required minimum distributions

  • There is no penalty for withdrawing contributions

  • With right distribution management, you can diversify your taxes in retirement

Cons

  • Taxes are paid upfront, rather than when you withdraw

  • The maximum contribution is low - only $6,000/year

  • You have to keep track of your account and set it up yourself

  • You can only open a Roth IRA if you meet the income limit requirements

Is one better than the other?

Not necessarily - the biggest difference between the two is how the contributions are taxed, so, depending on your situation, this will be the biggest factor in your decision. Your income will also help - if you make too much to contribute to a Roth IRA, then the decision’s been made for you.

Typically, people will opt for a Roth IRA if they can, mainly because of the lack of restrictions for withdrawals and during retirement. Also, while you may be getting an immediate benefit of tax breaks now when you contribute to a traditional IRA, you’ll have to deal with that when you retire. In the end, it’s up to you to decide which IRA is best for your situation.

Which type of IRA do you contribute to? Do you think one is better than the other? Let us know in the comments!

Investing for Beginners: When, Why, and How

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Almost every financial advice resource - from your advisors, to online blogs, to your family member you only see once a year at reunions who claims they know more about money than anyone else in the family - says that in order to have stable finances and independence, you should invest your money.

Sure, it sounds like a smart thing to do. All the rich people do it, right? Why shouldn’t I?

So, you sit down at your computer, and you wonder - how do I even begin? What is a stock? How do I “match my 401k?” What about my debts?

With all these questions in your mind, it’s easy to put investing off until you think you’re ready. But we’re here to tell you - the sooner you start investing, the better off your future will be. Even if it’s small, investing should absolutely be included in your financial planning.

Here’s our quick-start guide on how to research, prepare, and begin investing:

Figure out your why, and why now.

You’ve probably heard many times with almost every smart habit to just start now. Just start exercising now. Just start eating healthy now. Quit smoking now. Start saving now. The same can be said of investing - to an extent.

If you are in a viable position where putting money into investments won’t hurt your current living situation, then start now. If you don’t have savings, or have a huge loan to pay off (such as school), or if you haven’t done your research, make sure these are done first.

Best of all - if you can figure out how to manage these aspects and put a little way to start investments, then you’re golden.

Make sure you also figure out why you want to invest, as this will help you determine what to invest in. Is your goal long-term or short-term? Are you buying a house? Are you saving for retirement? Clearly determining your why will set you up on a much more successful - and much less intimidating - investment path.

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Learn the different types of investments.

There are many different options to choose from, and investing smartly means choosing the options that are best for you. These types include:

Stocks - These are probably what you think of when you hear “investing”. A stock is a share of a company that you purchase at a price determined by the stock market (depending on market climate and how well that company is performing). As a shareholder, you have the opportunity to vote at shareholder’s meetings, as well as receive dividends (which the amount is determined based on if you hold a common stock or a preferred stock).

Bonds - These are loaned by an investor to a company in exchange for interest payments plus the bond’s face value when the bond matures. Bonds are issued by corporations, the federal government, and states and municipalities.

Mutual Funds - Managed by an investment manager, mutual funds are pools of investing money that can be used in stocks, bonds, and other types of investments simultaneously. Mutual funds are valued at the end of a market day, and can be accessed and traded after market hours as well. Distributions are made in the form of dividends, interest, and capital gains.

ETF’s - Similar to mutual funds, but are traded on stock exchange during the market day. ETF’s are valued constantly while markets are open, unlike mutual funds.

Real Estate - These are made by purchasing a property directly - residential or commercial. These investment trusts are then pooled together with the investor’s money and purchase properties, and traded like stocks. Mutual funds and ETF’s can also invest in real estate investment trusts.

Hedge Funds - Only open to those who meet income and net worth requirements, hedge funds can virtually invest anywhere and are more likely to hold up in more volatile markets.

Private Equity - Another type of investment that has income and net worth requirements. This is a way for companies to raise capital without going public.

401K - Did you know that matching your employer’s contribution to your 401k is considered an investment? If your company offers this, take advantage of it as soon as possible. While it may be hard to part with that money now, your future self will certainly thank you later.

Determine your course of action.

Now that you have a better idea of your options, it’s time to make a plan. While it is possible to plan on your own, it’s much easier to find a professional who can help you. When you meet with Milborn Advisors, you will be asked to prepare all necessary documents to see exactly how far you are on your financial journey and if you are ready to invest. We’re even able to help you set up your investing account through TD Ameritrade - you tell us what you want to invest in, and we will take care of the rest!

Investing can be scary, but it doesn’t have to be - as long as you know why you want to invest, what you can invest in, and have a strong team behind you, you can absolutely use investments to supplement your financial goals!

Contact us today for your free consultation!

What’s holding you back from investing? Let us know in the comments!